Work Area: International Development

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Cause4 Team’s Response to Oxfam Scandal

Emily It’s a scandal fit for our times. After Weinstein, Westminster, and the Presidents Club, the fact that senior aid workers for Oxfam in Haiti and Chad perpetrated abuse against vulnerable women is yet another example of privileged men using their power to exploit those who are dependent on their work. Yet the Oxfam scandal […]

International aid cash transfers – an effective tool for independence, or a waste of British taxpayers’ money?

Entwined with the history of imperialism is how richer countries give money to poorer countries – something they have been doing in various ways since the 19th century.[1] People usually think of international giving as programmes or aid goods packages, however a growing trend is appearing to complement or replace these interventions – cash transfers. […]

MacArthur Foundation’s 100&Change Competition

100&Change is a MacArthur Foundation competition for a $100 million grant to fund a single proposal that promises real and measurable progress in solving a critical problem of our time, in any problem area. From nearly 2,000 applications, four finalists have been selected, and are due to present their solutions at a live event in […]

Foreign Aid Spending

The UK has continued its commitment to spend 0.7% of Gross National Income on overseas development aid each year,[1] (The UN’s target for all developed countries in place since 1970), believing that this helps to build a ‘safer, healthier, more prosperous world for people in developing countries and in the UK’.[2] The UK first managed […]

Break it Down: How Charities Approach the Insurmountable

It’s so easy to dwell, in difficult times, on the negatives. The current news cycle has seen bad news item after bad news item: without wanting to be melodramatic, it feels like the sky is falling down. If you’re an optimist, your immediate response may be to try and find a silver lining. Positive thinking is a powerful thing, however unless it is coupled with action, it cannot affect real change.

Can we get rid of poverty?

Saturday, October 17 marked the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. Although this day has been observed every year since 1993, this was the first time it had been observed since the conclusion of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and post-2015 development agenda, Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). SDGs aim to eradicate extreme poverty by 2030 and ensure that everyone has equal rights to economic resources. Moreover, the World Bank announced that the proportion of the population that lives in extreme poverty will fall below 10% by the end of 2015 for the first time. Jim Yong Kim, President of the World Bank, credited investments into education and social safety nets for the dramatic reduction in poverty.

The Changing Landscape of International Aid

In 2001, the world was introduced to the newly named BRIC countries – Brazil, Russia, India and China. These nations represented the next powerhouses of the world economy. By 2050 it is estimated that they will be amongst the four most dominant economies in the world. Fourteen years on from this prediction, we are seeing these countries emerging as new funders, helping to support other developing countries.